Protect biodiversity and adopt the circular economy

In simple terms, adopting a circular economy means shifting away from a linear, vertical production model, where raw materials are extracted to support production for consumption, which generates waste, and moving towards a "circular" model. With the latter, new patterns of "virtuous" design, production and consumption are encouraged, with less reliance on natural resources, and priority given to the re-use of materials already within products. Because everything can be re-purposed, and above all, nothing (should be) wasted! Reduce, collect, re-use, recycle; these are cornerstones of the circular economy.

 

Roadmap 2016-2020

 

The circular economy model

In simple terms, adopting a circular economy means shifting away from a linear, vertical production model, where raw materials are extracted to support production for consumption, which generates waste, and moving towards a "circular" model. With the latter, new patterns of "virtuous" design, production and consumption are encouraged, with less reliance on natural resources, and priority given to the re-use of materials already within products. Because everything can be re-purposed, and above all, nothing (should be) wasted! Reduce, collect, re-use, recycle; these are cornerstones of the circular economy.

  1. Orange an actor at COP21 in Paris

 

Ecodesign: minimising impacts at source

To minimise the environmental impact of equipment used both by Orange in-house and by our customers, staff at the Technocentre and at Orange Labs spend time and effort developing eco-design programmes to reduce the environmental impact of our products.

  1. Reducing the impact of products and services with eco-design

 

Rethinking our dependency on criticalmaterials

In 2011 Orange initiated a study into scarce and critical resources involved in the manufacture of its electronic equipment. Following the study, mapping was generated to assess our dependence on these resources.  Today we are taking measures across our entire supply chain, working with our suppliers in seeking to bring new types of deposit on stream, while also looking to the future with Orange Labs working on studies for using alternatives to critical ores.

  1. Rare resources and critical materials

 

Optimising waste management

The Group acts through three complementary channels:

  • optimising management for waste and end-of-life equipment generated internally, by setting up processing systems adapted to each waste category and ensuring traceability;
  • collecting and processing customers' used electronic equipment, using approved external partners or collective channels (where they exist);
  • extending the life of equipment by developing re-use by Orange customers or other actors.

 

Orange has developed waste management systems for every situation, to reduce the impact of Group activities on the environment. Two reference manuals have been created: one for Europe and one for Africa and the Middle East. They enable Orange Group entities to take control of all stages in the waste management process: inventory and sorting, managing collection and processing channels, traceability and transparency of these channels, contractual aspects and legal oversight.

 

Collecting customers’ electronic devices

WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) from business represents very significant volumes and customer challenges. Orange has set up adapted mechanisms to provide services to our business and key account customers in France.

 

 

Orange also wants to help develop recycling, with suitably adapted schemes, in countries where formal structures for processing waste do not yet exist. The Group has launched several projects in Africa and the Middle East, in collaboration with external players; in Jordan, Senegal, Niger and Mali for instance.

 

Giving mobiles a second life

Orange has committed to accelerating its transition towards the circular economy, setting an objective of 30% collection for used mobile phones in Europe by 2020 (against 14% and 1.7 million mobiles in 2015), and by developing the sale of second hand and re-conditioned devices.

To that end, and for many years, Orange has been setting up collection schemes for its private customers' used telephones, with various initiatives adapted to the targeted countries: partnerships with collection organisations, eco-citizen collection campaigns, buying back old equipment.

In Africa, Orange promotes the creation of partnerships aiming to support the implementation of local initiatives. The Group has helped set up several collection and recycling workshops for mobiles in Africa, in partnership with Emmaüs International

  1. Recycling used mobiles with Ateliers du Bocage
  2. MobiNil sets the example in electronic waste management